Law News and Tips

Health Care Privacy

Fred Vilbig - Friday, September 07, 2018

HEALTH CARE PRIVACY

Fred L. Vilbig © 2018

     HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Availability Act. Many people refer to it as the “Privacy Law.” It’s a thick law (something like 2 inches), and it covers more than just protecting medical records, but that’s the provision that impacts people the most.Most doctors and hospitals have interpreted it to mean that without (written) permission, they can’t talk to anyone about anyone else’s medical condition. One of my former partners had to read the whole thing, and he didn’t think that was what it required, but that’s not what the lawyers for the health care industry thought.

     When the law was first passed, medical providers became like Sergeant Shultz – “I know nothink!” One father (who happened to be an attorney) got a call from a hospital in Denver. His daughter had been skiing in Colorado, and the hospital told him he needed to come out. When he asked what was wrong, they said they couldn’t tell him because of HIPAA. Then there was the couple in a car accident. The husband was banged up, but the wife was unconscious and needed surgery. They asked him to sign an “informed consent.” When he asked what was wrong and what they were going to do, they said they also couldn’t tell him because of HIPAA.

     Medical professional have relaxed these strict standards somewhat, but it can still be an issue. If you want medical professionals to be able to talk to your loved ones when you are unable to give consent, you need to execute a HIPAA authorization of some sort. Even more, it would be better to sign a medical power of attorney with HIPAA authorization in it allowing medical professionals to talk to family members. We usually do a Medical Directive which is a combination health care power of attorney and living will that includes broad HIPAA authorizations. We also do a separate HIPAA authorization (perhaps overkill) allowing medical professionals to talk to family even when you’re not incapacitated.

     When I talk to clients about Medical Directives, they often tell me that they already have one. Upon admission to a hospital, patients are often asked (if not required) to sign a HIPAA release. They vary from place to place, so I can only talk about the ones I have seen, but in some instances (not all though) the releases are very narrow. They only apply to that particular stay at that particular hospital or doctor’s office. You can use those forms at any other time or any other place. So if you have a serious medical event, that HIPAA authorization won’t do you much good.

     So even if you already have some sort of a HIPAA authorization, you might want to look at it. And if you don’t have one, you should think seriously about getting one. When you need it, it’s too late to sign one.

Contact Fred now about your situation. The first consultation is free. Or call him now at (314) 241-3963