Law News and Tips

Health Care Planning

Fred Vilbig - Monday, February 22, 2016

I have a client in her late 80s. Since she has mobility issues, I went by her house to answer some questions she had. Her health has been failing, so she wanted to make sure that her affairs were in order.

She had her estate plan prepared by another attorney over 25 years ago. The laws have changed a lot since then, but not in ways that really affected her plan.

She had a trust. It all looked in order. We checked her various accounts and assets. It looked as if they were all in her name as trustee, which is what I wanted to see. There were some questions about her IRAs, but I told her son and daughter-in-law what they needed to do with those. That was kind of an easy fix.

She also had a pour over will. A pour over will is like a safety net to make sure everything ends up flowing through the trust which is the primary document.

I didn’t see a financial durable power of attorney in her estate planning documents folder which I thought was odd. A durable power of attorney for financial matters authorizes someone to handle your financial assets for your benefit when you are no longer able to do so.

I asked about it, and her son handed me another folder that had the power of attorney in it. It was in a different style from the trust and the will too. When I asked questions about it, they told me they had printed it off the Internet. Evidently the attorney who prepared the will and the trust had not prepared a financial durable power of attorney for her.

Since my client’s health was not good, her daughter-in-law asked about medical decisions. I asked if they had a medical directive. I got blank stares. I asked about a health care power of attorney. More blank stares. I asked about a living will, and they said that they had heard of that. It turns out that apparently their estate planning attorney had not addressed any medical issues with her.

There are really two types of documents or provisions that we use to address health care issues. The first is a medical durable power of attorney. By means of this document, a client authorizes someone to make medical decisions when they are not able to. These are not necessarily end-of-life kind of things. For instance, someone needs to say it’s okay to set your broken arm when you passed out after you broke it.

The other type of healthcare document is the living will. A living will provides that when you are in a persistent vegetative state with no reasonable expectation of recovery, no “extraordinary means” should be taken to continue your life. In Missouri, the phrase “extraordinary means” is not specifically defined. Unless you state otherwise, it is presumed that a patient wants all procedures to be used to keep them alive. You have to specifically indicate if you want the healthcare professionals to withhold chemotherapy, radiation therapy, CPR, artificial nutrition and hydration, and even antibiotics. You do this with a living will.

Typically, the medical durable power of attorney and the living will are combined in a single document referred to as a medical directive or a health care directive. It makes sense to combine them since they deal with different aspects of basically the same situation.

Planning your estate without providing for medical decisions seems to be an incomplete job. After talking to my client about this, I recommended that we prepare a medical directive for her. She agreed. This should make things a lot easier when the time comes.
Comments
Post has no comments.
Post a Comment



Captcha Image

Trackback Link
http://www.law-matters.net/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=11089&PostID=702507&A=Trackback
Trackbacks
Post has no trackbacks.