Law News and Tips

When is it the Right Time?

Fred Vilbig - Monday, February 15, 2016

Some time ago, an older couple came into my office to do their estate planning. She was 85, and he was 86.

As with all of my clients, I had sent them an estate planning questionnaire that helps me to gather information I’ll need to make a recommendation on a plan that would work for them. It asks for family information, financial information, and the names of the people they would want to take care of things when they are no longer able to do things for themselves either due to disability or death.

Right in the middle of the questionnaire is a page that is mainly blank. It asks the client to tell me what they want to have happen to their property on their death. The can write it out; they can do a diagram; or they can draw pictures. Based on that, I develop a plan.

When I was meeting with this older couple, they had brought in their questionnaire. They had completed the family information. The financial information was pretty detailed and told me what I needed to know. They also had listed the people they wanted to handle things when they couldn’t. However, they had left the center page completely blank. This was kind of odd.

So I asked, “What do you want to have happen to your property when you’re gone?” And the wife burst into tears. I don’t mean that she just started weeping. It was kind of like wailing.

I was really surprised. I had never had a client do that before. So I turned to the husband and said, “I’m sorry. What did I say?” He leaned forward a little and in a very gravelly voice, he said, “Aw, don’t worry. She just doesn’t want to admit we’re gonna die.” Talk about denial. Now to her credit, the only time she had even been in a hospital was when her two boys had been born, but still.

People often tell me that they are going to come see me to get a will or a trust done. My standard response is, “OK, but just don’t die in the meantime.” I know it’s a little insensitive, but it is the hard truth.

Nobody wants to think about death, much less their own. It’s hard to comprehend for one thing: one minute you’re here, and the next, you’re gone. It can be pretty depressing.

However, not planning seems kind of irresponsible to me. If you have minor children, you don’t want them to end up in foster care or have your life insurance be administered by the probate court. You don’t want your estate to be probated generally. I would think you want to be able to name the person who is going to take care of your kids and administer your assets.

So when is the best time to plan your estate? Honestly, it’s right before you die. But no one knows when that day will come except maybe when it’s already upon you. We all know people who have died suddenly from a heart attack or some freak accident. We know other people who were struck with a debilitating disease in the prime of life. We never know when our time will come.

So when is the right time to plan your estate? Now. Don’t wait until it’s too late.

Comments
Post has no comments.
Post a Comment



Captcha Image

Trackback Link
http://www.law-matters.net/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=11089&PostID=702506&A=Trackback
Trackbacks
Post has no trackbacks.