Law News and Tips

When Mom Dies . . . Part 2

Fred Vilbig - Tuesday, April 18, 2017

When Mom Dies . . . Part 2

 

WHEN MOM DIES … (Part 2)

       More Things to Be Done

In another paper, I talk about some of the things that people need to take care of when a family member or close friend dies.That paper dealt with things such as notifying government agencies and financial institutions in order to avoid identity theft or fraud. Now I want to turn to some of the administrative things you may need to do.

Funerals

First I should talk about the funeral. Although I have had some people say that planning a person’s funeral can be rewarding since everyone reminisces about the decedent, it can also be stressful. If you are lucky, the decedent had pre-arranged their funeral which takes a lot of the burden off of loved ones.However, there are still a few administrative things that need to be taken care of.

If the decedent did not have a pre-arranged funeral, then you will need to choose a funeral home. Once you’re selected the funeral home, you need to (1) arrange for the body to be transported there; (2) pick out a casket (which is not fun); (3) discuss all of the arrangements with the funeral director (and it seems like there are millions of them); and (4) then figure out how to pay for all of this. This process can be a lot of work under very stressful conditions.

I have found that it isn’t until after the funeral that you really have time to grieve. It’s not until all the activity is over and everyone has left that you realize what has happened.It is important to take time to get through that period, but don’t drown in it.

The Will

When you’re ready, you need to start the work. You need to search all of the decedent’s records to see what assets they owned and to find any important papers.If you find an original will, you are required to file it with the probate court where the person died.If you only find a copy, you are not required to file the copy. The will might be in a safe or safe-deposit box, but you need to try to locate it.If a will isn’t filed within a year of a decedent’s death, then it is invalid, and any probate required would be what is called intestate.

Life Insurance

In your search, you may come across one or more life insurance policies.Sometimes our clients find very old, rather small policies.In fact, some of those particular insurance companies may no longer be around.However, paid-up outstanding insurance policies don’t just disappear.Some insurance company would have taken them over, and they will be required to pay the benefit.You just need to talk to the state Department of Insurance to track them down.Then you need to figure out who the beneficiaries are, and they need to file a claim.

Retirement Accounts

You may also come across retirement accounts such as IRAs or 401(k)s (403(b)s for employees of nonprofit corporations).You need to determine who the beneficiaries are and notify them so they can file a claim.If you don’t know who they are, you should contact the plan administrator.In any event, the beneficiaries may want to ask you questions about these accounts, but be very careful.Inherited IRAs can be kind of tricky with some tax land mines hidden below the surface.It is best to direct them to their financial planner or tax professional.Better safe than sorry.

Joint Property

Then there is the question of joint property. If property – whether it be bank accounts, real estate, brokerage accounts, individual stocks, or any other property – is owned jointly, then ownership transfers to the surviving joint owner(s).In the case of financial assets, either you or the joint owner(s) need to notify the financial institution.If the asset is real estate, then you need to file an affidavit as to death with the appropriate deed recorder’s office.

Probate

If it turns out that some or all of these assets were owned solely in the decedent’s name, and if the total value of the assets is less than $40,000, then you can administer those assets in a small estate. However, if the value of the assets is over $40,000, then you need to open a full estate.Either way, those assets are frozen until you get some sort of a court order.

Taking care of things after a person’s death is not necessarily an easy thing to do. Still, it is important for the survivors that things get done properly.Care and attention to detail is invaluable.Otherwise, problems may pop up in future years.And fixing things 10 or even 20 years from now is harder than just fixing them now.

Contact Fred now about your situation. The first consultation is free. Or call him now at (314) 241-3963

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