Law News and Tips

Your Legacy

Fred Vilbig - Friday, January 04, 2019

Your Legacy

Without a plan in place things fall apart. 

Fred L. Vilbig © 2019

     Life is short. The older I get, the more evident that becomes. When I was young, 30 seemed so old; 60 seemed like forever away and 70 was an eternity, and 80 or 90 was just incomprehensible nonsense. And then suddenly, it’s here. We don’t necessarily feel that old. In fact, in our heads, we’re still 25 or 30, but the mirror tells us something entirely different. How can all of that happen?

     And when you start to think about the brevity of life, you can start to think about what your life has meant. We take ourselves entirely too seriously (and probably rightfully so) to just see ourselves as some passing mist – here today and gone and forgotten tomorrow. Many people start to think about their legacy – when we’re gone, how will people remember us?

     That was brought home to me recently when working with some business owners. They had spent most of their adult years nurturing and growing a business, and now time was catching up. They wanted to plan what to do carefully so there wasn’t a train wreck when they died, but they were having trouble letting go. This is very common.

     One of the business owners had a child involved in the business and two others who weren’t. He really wanted things to end harmoniously for the family as a whole, protect the son in the business because of the grandchildren, and also protect the employees, some of whom had been with him for years. It was sort of complex calculus.

     Another business owner didn’t have any family active in the business, but the business was the principal asset of his estate. The most likely successors to his business were some key employees. So he wanted to plan a fair transition that protected employees while also providing an inheritance for his family.

     Although there may be similarities in different business plans like this, I have found that subtle differences in focuses can have major impacts on the resulting plan. The dynamic relations between family members can result in vastly varying solutions. The complex politics of a business can require a carefully finessed plan that makes individuals feel valued without undermining the operation of the business. And then there’s the question of getting it all financed.

     And I’ve seen many times where business owners just run out of time. Once a fifty-year-old trial attorney I knew dropped dead on the beach because he was so stressed out about his partners forcing him to take a vacation. Several times we have had healthy people simply go to sleep never again to wake up. And without a plan in place (sure they had thought about it), things fell apart: the business was sold to outsiders at a discount and the surviving family got shortchanged.

     So what is your legacy? Will you be soon forgotten for lack of a plan, or will you be fondly remembered through the continuation of the business you have (almost miraculously) grown into a success? I’d love to have a chance to talk with you about this.

Contact Fred now about your situation. The first consultation is free. Or call him now at (314) 241-3963

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